High School Students Wanted for Mars Lander Project

Get Involved in Mars Society “Red Eagle” Student Contest to Design Mars Lander

Students and from the Barboza Space Center will support other teams that want to try for this new international competition.  Write your letter for possible collaboration and send it to Barboza Space Center (Suprschool@aol.com.  Attention Bob Barboza.

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What do I need to do to get started?

The Mars Society recently announced plans for an international student engineering contest to design a lander capable of delivering a ten metric ton payload safely to the surface of Mars. The competition is open to student teams from around the world. Participants are free to choose any technology to accomplish the proposed mission and need to submit design reports of no more than 50 pages by March 31, 2018.

These contest reports will be evaluated by a panel of judges and will serve as the basis for a down-select to ten finalists who will be invited to present their work in person at the next International Mars Society Convention in September 2018. The first place winning team will receive a trophy and a $10,000 cash prize. Second through fifth place winners will receive trophies and prizes of $5,000, 3,000, $2000, and $1,000 respectively. In honor of the first craft used to deliver astronauts to another world, the contest is being named “Red Eagle.”

Background:

The key missing capability required to send human expeditions to Mars is the ability to land large payloads on the Red Planet. The largest capacity demonstrated landing system is that used by Curiosity, which delivered 1 ton. That is not enough to support human expeditions, whose minimal requirement is a ten ton landing capacity. NASA has identified this as a key obstacle to human missions to Mars, but has no program to develop any such lander. SpaceX had a program, called Red Dragon, which might have created a comparable capability, but it was cancelled when NASA showed no interest in using such a system to soft land crews returning to Earth from the ISS or other near-term missions.

In the absence of such a capability, NASA has been reduced to proposing irrelevant projects, such as building a space station in lunar orbit (not needed for either lunar or Mars expeditions), or claim that it is working on the technology for large visionary interplanetary spaceships which will someday sail from lunar orbit to Mars orbit and back, accomplishing nothing.

For full details about the Red Eagle student engineering contest, including team rules, guidelines and requirements, please click here.

 

 

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Italy, Puerto Rico Needs Your Help

 

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The Lights On Puerto Rico Project

We are calling on students, teachers, musicians and music lovers to join us on the making of the theme song “Lights On Puerto Rico”.  This is a not for profit project to help students on  the island of Puerto Rico.   Our goal is to insure that we do not forget about Puerto Rico.  We want to keep Puerto Rico in the conversation.

You can help by singing our theme song and recording it by cell phone and sending it to Kids Talk Radio.  You can sing or play it by yourself or with a group.   We will provide the support, sheet music and permissions by PDF file.

This project will give you and your group an opportunity to help put a smile on a few faces in Puerto Rico.

If you have any other ideas that might help, we setup a special websites where our students are using STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages) to keep the conversation going.

These are tough times in the USA and around the world.  Maybe if we work tougher, we can make this world a better place.  This project is a good first step.

Some of our students and teachers are using ideas from our Occupy Mars project technology to find creative ways to use science, technology and engineering to help Puerto Rico.

We hope you will join us and help to put a smile on a few faces

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Barboza Space Center

Kids Talk Radio Science

suprschool@aol.com

www.KidsTalkRadioScience.com

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

About the song: “ Light On Puerto Rico”

This song is a collaboration of Bob Barboza and Michael Vlatkovich. It was composed and arranged for the people of Puerto Rico and not for commercial purposes.  You need permission to use this song.  Send your email to suprschool@aol.com.  Most  people were recruited to participate in this program.  We are happy to communicate with you.

November 1, 2017.

© 2017, Light On Puerto Rico, All rights reserved.

Italy Puerto Rico Needs Your Help

 

Light On Puerto Rico Theme Song JPEG.jpeg

The Lights On Puerto Rico Project

We are calling on students, teachers, musicians and music lovers to join us on the making of the theme song “Lights On Puerto Rico”.  This is a not for profit project to help students on  the island of Puerto Rico.   Our goal is to insure that we do not forget about Puerto Rico.  We want to keep Puerto Rico in the conversation.

You can help by singing our theme song and recording it by cell phone and sending it to Kids Talk Radio.  You can sing or play it by yourself or with a group.   We will provide the support, sheet music and permissions by PDF file.

This project will give you and your group an opportunity to help put a smile on a few faces in Puerto Rico.

If you have any other ideas that might help, we setup a special websites where our students are using STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages) to keep the conversation going.

These are tough times in the USA and around the world.  Maybe if we work tougher, we can make this world a better place.  This project is a good first step.

Some of our students and teachers are using ideas from our Occupy Mars project technology to find creative ways to use science, technology and engineering to help Puerto Rico.

We hope you will join us and help to put a smile on a few faces

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Barboza Space Center

Kids Talk Radio Science

suprschool@aol.com

www.KidsTalkRadioScience.com

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

About the song: “ Light On Puerto Rico”

This song is a collaboration of Bob Barboza and Michael Vlatkovich. It was composed and arranged for the people of Puerto Rico and not for commercial purposes.  You need permission to use this song.  Send your email to suprschool@aol.com.  Most  people were recruited to participate in this program.  We are happy to communicate with you.

November 1, 2017.

© 2017, Light On Puerto Rico, All rights reserved.

Calculus Teachers Needed

The teachers at the Barboza Space Center are looking for fun space math projects using calculus.  We are teaching teams of high school students that are training to become Jr. astronauts, scientists and engineers.   Our students have labtop computers and scientific calculators.   Some of our students will be using slide rulers.  Here is a sample of a project on one sheet of paper.

We welcome you email:

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Barboza Space Center

Suprschool@aol.com

http://www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.WordPress.com

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How can Italy help Puerto Rico?

Troubled By Flint Water Crisis, 11-Year-Old Girl Invents Lead-Detecting Device

Gitanjali Rao, 11, says she was appalled by the drinking water crisis in Flint, Mich. — so she designed a device to test for lead faster. She was named “America’s Top Young Scientist” on Tuesday at the 3M Innovation Center in St. Paul, Minn.

Andy King/Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge

When the drinking water in Flint, Mich., became contaminated with lead, causing a major public health crisis, 11-year-old Gitanjali Rao took notice.

“I had been following the Flint, Michigan, issue for about two years,” the seventh-grader told ABC News. “I was appalled by the number of people affected by lead contamination in water.”

She saw her parents testing the water in their own home in Lone Tree, Colo., and was unimpressed by the options, which can be slow, unreliable or both.

“I went, ‘Well, this is not a reliable process and I’ve got to do something to change this,’ ” Rao told Business Insider.

Rao tells ABC that while she was doing her weekly perusal of MIT’s Materials Science and Engineering website to see “if there’s anything’s new,” she read about new technologies that could detect hazardous substances and decided to see whether they could be adapted to test for lead.

The Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge YouTube

She pressed local high schools and universities to give her lab time and then hunkered down in the “science room” — outfitted with a big white table — that she persuaded her engineer parents to create in their home.

And she set about devising a more efficient solution: a device that could identify lead compounds in water and was portable and relatively inexpensive.

As she explains at lightning speed in her video submission for the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge, her device consists of three parts. There is a disposable cartridge containing chemically treated carbon nanotube arrays, an Arduino-based signal processor with a Bluetooth attachment, and a smartphone app that can display the results.

Here is how it works.

The carbon nanotubes in the cartridge are sensitive to changes in the flow of electrons. Those tubes are lined with atoms that have an affinity to lead, which adds a measurable resistance to the electron flow.

When the cartridge is dipped in water that is clean, the electron flow doesn’t change and the smartphone app shows that water is safe to drink. But when the cartridge is dipped in contaminated water, the lead in the water reacts to the atoms, causing resistance in the electron flow that is measured by the Arduino processor. The app then shows that the water isn’t safe to drink.

Rao dubbed the device Tethys, for the Greek goddess of fresh water.

“Clean water always tastes good,” she says at the end of her video. “The tool allows easy testing at home or by agencies for quick detection and remedial actions. It can be expanded in the future to test for other chemical contaminants in potable water. I hope this helps in a small way to detect and prevent long-term health effects of lead contamination for many of us.”

To make her device, Rao pressed local high schools and universities to give her lab time and then hunkered down in the “science room” — outfitted with a big white table — that she persuaded her engineer parents to create in their home in Lone Tree, Colo.

Bharathi Rao

Her solution was so ingenious that this week, Rao was named “America’s Top Young Scientist” in the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge — a distinction that comes with a check for $25,000.

For the past three months, Rao and nine other finalists in the competition had been paired with scientists at 3M who helped them work from a theoretical concept to a physical prototype. Rao was matched with Kathleen Shafer, a research specialist who develops new plastics technologies.

Rao plans to save some of the prize money for college but use the rest to invest in her device to make it commercially viable.

“It’s not hyperbole to say she really blew us out of the water,” Brian Barnhart, a school superintendent in Illinois and one of the judges, told ABC. “The other nine kids, they were also such amazing kids, so for her to stand out the way she did with a peer group like this is like an exclamation point on top of it.”

Rao says that when she grows up, she would like to be a geneticist or epidemiologist. Her lead detection device allowed her to combine both interests, as contaminated water can cause both rashes and birth defects.

“I studied a little bit of both of these topics since I was really interested in these fields,” she told Business Insider, “and then I came up with this device to help save lives.”

How can students in Italy help Puerto Rico?

We are asking students, teachers and others to send their creative ideas and STEM & STEAM++ projects to help Puerto Rico keep their lights on and their water clean enough to drink.   We invited you to visit our new website and see what we have so far.

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Do what you can to keep the conversations and solutions for Puerto Rico going.

http://www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

How can you help?

Bob Barboza

Barboza Space Center, Kids Talk Radio Science

Suprschool@aol.com

 

*STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages.

How can High School Students in Italy Help Students in Puerto Rico

Kids Talk Radio Science Helping Puerto Rico

We are calling on students from around the world to help other students in Puerto Rico.  We are looking for your creative ideas to make drinking water safe to drink.  We are looking to use solar energy to to create light and to charge cell phones.

What other ideas do you have?

Visit the new Puerto Rico Website today and you will see what we are starting to do to help fellow students on the island.

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

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